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I’m unsure of the original origins of this recipe. It was given to me by my father-in-law after we had this for dinner at his home one evening. While it was a little different than the traditional cabbage rolls I was used to, I did enjoy it and I thought that it would dry perfectly. It did and it makes a great addition to our trail food.

backcountry cabbage casserole

dehydration time: 8 to 12 hours
makes 4 to 6 servings

If you are vegan you could easily substitute beef flavored TVP for the meat in the recipe.

1 pound ground beef
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 cup cooked rice
2 10 oz cans condensed tomato soup
salt and pepper, to taste
3 cups cabbage, shredded

At Home
Preheat oven to 350ºF. Meanwhile, brown the ground meat and onion in a large skillet. Drain off any fat and stir the tomato soup, rice, salt and pepper. Layer half the cabbage in a greased 9 x 13 inch dish, cover with the meat mixture and repeat the layering again. Cover the dish and bake for 1 1/2 hours.

Measure the casserole and write this measurement on a sticky note. Spread the food on dehydrator trays that have been lined with fruit roll inserts or plastic wrap and dry for 8 to 12 hours or until no moisture remains. Put the casserole and the sticky note in a ziplock freezer bag.

At Camp
Add enough boiling water to the dried ingredients in a pot to equal slightly less than the measurement on your sticky note. Be sure to account for and add your dried ingredients to the rehydration container prior to adding any water. You can always add more water if you need to. Once the dish has rehydrated, reheat it through if necessary.

Tips
Putting the container, be it a freezer bag or pot, that you reconstitute your food with inside of a cozy will generally eliminate the need for reheating the food after rehydration. This, of course, depends on factors such as the time of year.

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makes 2 servings

Couscous makes a wonderful breakfast food since it cooks very quickly.

1 cup instant couscous
1 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
1/2 cup chopped dried pears, peaches, and mangoes
1 teaspoon crystallized stem ginger
1/2 teaspoon creamed coconut or 3 tablespoons coconut powder
1 1/2 teaspoons butter (optional)
Enough soy or whole milk powder to make 1/2 cup milk
1 1/4 cups, plus 1 teaspoon hot water, plus enough water to reconstitute milk

At Home
Place the couscous and brown sugar in a medium sized freezer ziplock bag. Place the fruit, ginger, milk, and coconut in separate bags, and put the bags in with the couscous. Add the butter to what you are taking on your trip.

At Camp
Bring 1 1/4 cups water to a boil. While you wait mix the couscous and brown sugar mixture with the fruit, ginger, and butter in a freezer ziplock bag. Place the coconut cream in a bag or container large enough to accommodate at least 1/2 cup of liquid. Add 1 teaspoon of hot water to the creamed coconut and mix. If you’re using coconut powder, then you will need to add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water. To the same container add enough milk powder and water to make a 1/2 cup of milk. Carefully pour the boiling water into the bag with the couscous mixture. Let stand 5 minutes. Stir the couscous, scoop it in bowls, and top it with the milk mixture.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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