Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘backpacking’

A fellow, known online by the name of Oregonhiker, graciously granted permission for me to share his trail recipe for a quinoa-based Jambalaya with you. Quinoa is a favorite in our family, as is Jambalaya and combining the two is a great idea (I wish I had thought of it). If you haven’t used quinoa before and would like to learn more about it, please visit wildernesscooking.com for more information.

I’d like to thank Oregonhiker for taking the time to create this yummy recipe.  Here it is along with some great tips.

I added a new recipe to my camping food list. This is new in two respects, one is the Jambalaya and the other is using quinoa.

Quinoa is a grain that is high in protein, has a nutty flavor and hydrates very easily. My son used this on the PCT, starting from dry grain and adding water.

 jambalaya

dehydration time: 8 to 10 hours
makes 3 to 4 servings

1 1/2 cups quinoa (rinsed and drained)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion (minced)
1 bell pepper (minced)
10 fresh mushrooms (minced)
28 ounces canned crushed tomatoes
15 ounces canned white beans (drained)
8 ounces fish – more on this later
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Place the quinoa in a saucepan with 2 3/4 cups water, bring to a boil; then reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes or until tender and translucent. Set this aside.

Heat a fry pan over medium-low heat, add the olive oil. When the oil is hot add the onions, bell peppers and mushrooms and stir for 10 minutes.

Stir in the tomatoes, beans, fish and herbs and bring to a boil, let in simmer for 5 minutes.

At this point your kitchen should be filled with a heavenly smell.

Add the quinoa to the mixture and blend.

For my first attempt I used tuna for the fish. This didn’t work very well as the tuna didn’t seem to rehydrate well and although the taste was very nice it was extremely chewy. The original recipe called for deveined shrimp.

Spread this mixture out onto dehydrator trays and dehydrate. I did it overnight on the plastic trays that hold moisture, and I had to flip the food over in the morning to fully dry it all.

This then goes into ziplock bags. On the trail I simply put the Jambalaya into my cook pot, added water to cover the food and brought it to a boil and simmered a couple of minutes, and then let it sit a few minutes to fully hydrate. The amount of water you add is something you need to experiment with, if you add too much you just end up with a bit of soup to finish off your meal with. I do stir the mix while heating to be sure that it doesn’t burn on the bottom.

Some recipes suggest adding boiling water to the ziplock bag. I don’t favor this approach as there is a significant amount of research out there about the potential for unwanted chemicals to leach out of the plastic into your food. For me clean up is a breeze, just a little water in the pot, a quick scrub with my no-see-um net scrubber and the pot is clean.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

apple pie gr-oatmeal

dehydration time: 7 to 10 hours
makes 1 to 2 servings

This warm and hearty oatmeal tastes a little like Mom’s apple pie.

1/3 cup applesauce
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup dried apples, chopped
2 tablespoons of granola
1 – 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
2 packages of regular instant oatmeal
2 tablespoons of soy or whole milk powder

At Home
Mix the cinnamon and applesauce together and spread on a lined dehydrator tray. The mixture will take 7 to 10 hours to dry and will be the consistency of fruit leather.  Wrap the dried applesauce and dried apples together in a piece of plastic wrap. Package the granola and brown sugar in a second piece of plastic wrap. Mix the oatmeal and milk powder together and place in a ziplock bag. Place the fruit and granola bundles in the same ziplock as the other ingredients.

At Camp
Take the apple and applesauce package out of the ziplock. Tear the applesauce leather into small pieces and place in your mug or a freezer bag with the dried apples. Rehydrate with just over 1/3 of a cup of boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes or until the desired consistency is reached. Place oatmeal in a bowl with the milk powder. Add boiling water to preferred consistency. Top with re-hydrated apple mixture and the granola and brown sugar mixture. Stir if desired.

Tip
If you don’t want to bother dehydrating applesauce and aren’t worried about a little weight in your pack then take a single serving container of applesauce.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2004
recipe courtesy of www.wildernesscooking.com

Read Full Post »

Dennis Schmitt, known for his work on the Philmont Country Cookbook and for authoring the A Taste of Troop 928 Cookbook, generously granted permission for me to share some trail egg nog recipes with you. You can find links to both cookbooks on MacScouter’s Cooking and Cookbooks page.

The first is a family friendly version and is completely yummy. Dennis says that it comes from the Troop 928 cookbook but may have appeared in an earlier book.

egg nog brink mix

1 1/2 cups instant dry milk
1/2 cup nondairy creamer
1/2 cup powder egg mix
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, ground
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, ground

At Camp
Mix 1/3 cup of mix with cold water and stir.

This second version is for the adults only.

egg nog – adult backpacker version 

2 oz light rum
1/4 cup powdered milk
1/3 cup water
1 tablespoons powdered sugar
1 – 1 1/2 tablespoons powder egg mix
nutmeg

At Camp
Shake all ingredients (except nutmeg) with ice or snow in a Nalgene bottle and strain into a sierra cup. Sprinkle nutmeg on top and serve.

Read Full Post »

dehydration time: 5 to 7 hours
makes 2 to 4 servings
 


I love tomatoes and roasting them really brings out their flavor. If you like things a little spicier then increase the cayenne pepper to suit your tastes.

1 small shallot
1/4 cup onion
1 clove garlic
2 cups grape or cherry tomatoes
1 tablespoon olive oil
kosher salt, to taste
black pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried ancho chile
1 teaspoon fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon lime zest (optional)
1 cup cannellini beans or white kidney beans, drained and rinsed

At Home
Preheat oven to 350ºF. Mince the shallot and onion. Cut the garlic and tomatoes in half. Put the shallot, onion, garlic and tomatoes in a shallow baking dish and drizzle with the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Bake for 45 minutes stirring occasionally. The tomatoes will start to brown and become very soft. Remove from the oven and let the mixture cool.

Place the tomato mixture in a blender or food processor with the remaining ingredients and pulse until well combined. Dehydrate on a lined tray as you would for fruit leather. The dip takes between 5 and 7 hours to dry. Once it is dry, you can grind it into a powder using a spice or coffee grinder to make it easier to rehydrate. Pack into a ziplock bag along with the camp instructions.

At Camp
Rehydrate the bean dip using a formula of 1½ parts dried mix to 1 part water. Wait 5 or 10 minutes and then add a little more water if necessary. When you reach your lunch stop, enjoy the dip with crackers, bread sticks, Greek pita wedges, or tortilla chips. It is also good in a wrap with chicken or vegetables.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2007
recipe courtesy of www.wildernesscooking.com

Read Full Post »

makes 20 Bars

This is a make-ahead backpacking recipe that is a pretty decadent addition to your trail food. 

chocolate almond cappucino bars

chocolate almond cappucino bars

3 large eggs
1 cup white sugar
1/2 cup lightly packed brown sugar
1/3 cup butter, melted
1 teaspoon almond extract
2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons instant coffee
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 to 3/4 cup slivered almonds, toasted
1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips or chunks

Preheat oven to 325ºF and butter a 9 x 13 inch baking pan. In a dry nonstick frying pan toast the almonds until they start to take on some color and are fragrant. Set aside.

With an electric mixer beat the eggs. Add the sugars, melted butter and almond extract and beat until the color lightens — about 1 minute. Mix the flour and salt together then add the dry ingredients to the egg, sugar and butter mixture stirring with a wooden spoon until combined.

Dissolve the instant coffee in the cream and set aside. Reserve 1/2 of batter and set aside. Add the toasted almonds and semi-sweet chocolate pieces to the remaining batter. Spread the mixture evenly into the prepared baking pan. The mixture will be quite thick.

Stir the heavy cream and coffee mixture into the reserved batter until well combined. Pour the second batter over the batter already in your baking pan and then drag a knife through both batters to create a marbled effect.

Bake at 325ºF for 25 minutes or until the edges are set and dry and the centre is firm but still glossy. Allow to cool before cutting into bars.

Variation: replace 1/4 cup of the semi-sweet chocolate pieces with 1/4 cup white chocolate chips and replace 1 teaspoon of almond extract with a 1/2 teaspoon of orange extract.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2007
recipe courtesy of www.wildernesscooking.com

Read Full Post »

This is just a quick hello and a note to tell you what my intentions are for this trail cooking blog. While I have another blog dedicated to trail cooking for backpackers and canoeists, it covers a vast range of topics from gear to grocery store finds. I’ve decided that it would be nice to have a blog simply dedicated to my backpacking recipes and those from other backpackers.

About the backpacking recipes…

Face it, we all have a different style when it comes to food for our wilderness adventures. With that in mind, you’ll see me post recipes here that cover a variety of these trail food styles. While many of these will be my own creations, from time to time I will feature the fare and techniques of other wilderness cooks… so if you want to share a recipe please email me via laurie@wildernesscooking.com.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts