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Archive for the ‘Lunches’ Category

As you probably have guessed by now, I really like dip-able things for my trail lunches. This one is really great with a little bit of goat cheese if you are an ovo-lacto vegetarian.

kara’a

vegan and gluten-free

dehydration time: 5–8 hours
makes 4-6 servings

This slightly spicy, Libyan inspired, pumpkin dip is a nice alternative to hummus. I first made it for my son when he was studying Libya in his Grade 5 social studies class. The addition of pumpkin seed butter is not traditional but it adds nutrition. It is best served with a warm flatbread such as naan or pita.

1 teaspoon caraway seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 fresh red chilli, seeded and finely chopped
pinch of kosher salt
2 cups cooked canned pumpkin
2 tablespoons pumpkin seed butter
juice of 1 lemon
fresh ground black pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

At Home
Toast the caraway and cumin seeds in a dry non-stick frying pan for a few minutes until they become fragrant. Using a mortar and pestle crush the seeds, then add the garlic, chili pepper, and a pinch of kosher salt. Grind into a paste. Pulse the pumpkin and pumpkin seed butter together in a food processor, add the lemon juice, fresh ground black pepper to taste, and the spice paste.

Spread evenly on lined dehydrator trays, keeping the mixture about 1/4 inch thick. Dry for 5 to 8 hours or until the mixture is thoroughly dry. Grind into a powder in a spice grinder or blender. Store in a medium ziplock freezer bag. Add the olive oil to the other olive oil you are taking on your trip.

At Camp
Rehydrate the pumpkin mixture using a formula of 1 1/2 parts dried mix to 1 part water. Wait 5 to 10 minutes then add a little more water if it’s too dry. Stir in 2 tablespoons of olive oil.

Tip
You may use fresh pumpkin or other squash that has been roasted or stewed for this but canned pumpkin is easier.

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vegetarian and vegan recipes

vegetarian and vegan recipes

I have finally completed the second instalment in my wilderness cookbook series. Well, let me rephrase that. I’m almost done—I just need to do one more read through of the final layouts before it hit the presses this week. I’m doing that today because it’s just easier to sneak away to a quiet spot for reading while Bryan is home for the weekend.

The book is entitled Another Fork in the Trail: Vegetarian and Vegan Recipes for the Backcountry and will be on shelves this Spring. If you like, you can pre-order at a variety of on-line retailers including Amazon.ca, Chapters.Indigo.ca, Amazon.com, and  BarnesandNoble.com.

I thought that I would take a short break and post one of my favorite lunch recipes from the book. This recipe isn’t just for the backcountry; we enjoy having this for a weekend lunch at home. If you want to have it at home just skip the dehydration instructions.

mediterranean garbanzo bean salad

dehydration time: 8–12 hours
makes 2 servings

I like to think of this salad as a little trip around the Mediterranean because it combines ingredients common in Spain, Italy, Greece, Israel, and Egypt. Za’atar is a flavorful spice blend available through Middle Eastern specialty stores and online spice retailers. This salad can be served cold but is especially delicious when served warm. You can even serve it over cooked quinoa or couscous for a nice dinner.

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil
1/3 cup shallots, finely chopped
1/4 teaspoon crushed red chilies (optional)
1 teaspoon orange zest
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
Segments of 1 large orange
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 cups canned chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained and rinsed
1/2 cup green olives, pitted and chopped
1/2 teaspoon za’atar spice blend
1 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

At Home
Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium to medium-high heat. Add the shallots and sauté for a few minutes. Add the crushed red chilies, orange zest, orange juice, and orange segments. Cook for a few more minutes and then add the lemon juice, chickpeas, olives, and za’atar spice blend. Simmer for a few minutes and then remove from the heat. Stir in the pepper and salt.

Allow the mixture to cool and then measure the amount you will dry. Write this measurement on a sticky note. Spread the salad on lined dehydrator trays to dry. When the salad is dry, package it in a ziplock freezer bag along with your note.

At Camp
Rehydrate the salad by adding enough boiling water to the mix to make it equal to the measurement on your sticky note. Be sure to account for and add your dried ingredients to the rehydration container prior to adding the water. You can always add more water if you need to. Once the salad has rehydrated, reheat it if desired.

Tips
If you can’t find za’atar, then use a combination of thyme and basil, as they will pair nicely with this salad as well.

If you’d like to have this recipe for lunch, you can add cold water to the mixture at breakfast and let it rehydrate in your pack as you travel.

This is also good for dinner served on couscous or quinoa that has been cooked with a little vegetable stock or orange juice or with pitas that have been toasted, drizzled with a little olive oil, and sprinkled with a bit of the za’atar spice.

From Another Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2010/2011

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I love salads on the trail as many of my readers know. Since writing this recipe for A Fork in the Trail, I have rehydrated it using cold water. It takes about 1/2 hour to rehydrate the couscous this way and eliminates the need to pull out the stove at lunchtime. That said, this salad tastes nice warm too.

curried tuna and couscous salad

dehydration time: 5 to 10 hours
makes 2 servings

Quick cooking and versatile, couscous makes a good base for a salad. This flavorful dressing works well with tuna, but to make it vegetarian use some of your favorite vegetables instead of the fish.

Salad
1/3 cup roasted cherry or grape tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 cup red onion, minced
1/2 cup instant whole wheat couscous
1 3 oz pouch tuna
1/4 cup sliced almonds

Dressing
1/4 teaspoon curry powder
1/2 teaspoon honey
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
¼–1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard to taste
2 tablespoons olive oil

At Home
Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Cut the tomatoes into halves or quarters and sprinkle with a little salt. Put them on an oiled baking sheet. Roast them for 30 to 40 minutes. Remove the tomatoes from the oven and allow them to cool. Dry the minced onions and cooked tomatoes on separate lined dehydrator trays for 5 to 10 hours or until dried thoroughly. Package in a ziplock freezer bag.

Place the couscous in a large ziplock freezer bag with a copy of the cooking instructions from the package. Add the pouch of tuna and the bag with the tomato mixture to the bag of couscous. Wrap the curry powder and almonds separately in plastic wrap. Pour the mustard, honey, and red wine vinegar in a leakproof container and place it in the bag of couscous along with the spice and almonds. Add the olive oil to the other oil that you will take on your trip.

At Camp
Add enough boiling water to the tomato and onion to barely cover them. Allow to sit for 15 to 20 minutes or until rehydrated. Prepare the couscous according to the directions you packed. Allow the couscous to cool. Make the dressing by mixing the mustard, honey, and red wine vinegar with 2 tablespoons olive oil and the curry powder. When the couscous is done, mix in the tomatoes and onions and add the dressing. Sprinkle with sliced almonds and stir gently to coat.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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I don’t like to have to pull the stove out at lunch, unless the weather is very cold, so I generally try to create no-cook lunches for our trips. This one is a family favorite and will be appearing in my upcoming book, Another Fork in the Trail. The book, the second in my backpacking cookbook series, is expected to be released in Spring 2010.

olive tapenade

dehydration time: 8 to 10 hours
makes 4 to 6 servings

I first had this tapenade at a Fall gathering being hosted in Ontario, Canada’s Algonquin Provincial Park. The original recipe belonged to my friend Alison and it was her contribution to an impromptu potluck. I have modified the dish to suit backcountry trips and although it is great as a spread, it can double as a refreshing addition to pasta.

olive tapenade

olive tapenade

1 cup pimento stuffed green olives, drained
1 cup pitted black olives, drained
1 cup marinated artichoke hearts, drained
1 hot banana pepper, coarsely chopped
1/2 sweet red pepper, coarsely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon dried basil
1 tablespoon capers, minced
1 tablespoon lemon or lime juice
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

At Home
Put the olives and artichokes in a food processor and pulse to chop the mixture. It should be a fine chop, but not to the point of being a puree. Put the olive mixture in a bowl and set aside. Next, put the peppers in the food processor and pulse until the peppers are the same consistency as the olive mixture. Add the peppers to the olive mixture along with the garlic, basil, capers and lemon juice. Stir until well combined.

Spread onto lined dehydrator trays and dry for 8 to 10 hours. Package the tapenade in a medium ziplock freezer bag and add the olive oil to the other olive oil you are taking on your trip.

At Camp
Rehydrate the tapenade using a formula of 1 1/2 parts dried mix to 1 part water. Let rehydrate for 10 minutes and add a little more water if necessary. Stir in 1 tablespoon of olive oil, if desired, and serve with your favorite cracker or flatbread.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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I am trying to avoid cross-posting with my other blog at wildernesscooking.com but this is such a great food for the trail that I thought I could make an exception. Often we want a trail lunch that is simple, lightweight, tasty and doesn’t require a lot of time or the use of a camp stove. Hummus is a tasty dish that fits all of that criteria. It can be used in a wrap with chicken for a nice light dinner meal.

sunny garlic hummus

dried hummus

sunny garlic hummus

dehydration time: 5 to 7 hours  
makes 2 to 4 servings

Hummus is one of the easiest things to make for a trail lunch, and this one has the sunny flavor of oranges.

1 19-ounce can chickpeas – rinsed and drained
1/4 cup orange juice
1/2 teaspoon lime juice
2 cloves garlic
1 heaping teaspoon orange zest
2 tablespoons tahini
Pinch of kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper

At Home
Combine and blend all the ingredients using a food processor or hand blender until you have a thick paste. Spread evenly on lined dehydrator trays, keeping the mixture about 1/4 inch thick. Dry for 5 to 7 hours or until the mixture crumbles and is thoroughly dry. Store in a medium ziplock freezer bag.

At Camp
Rehydrate the hummus using a formula of 1 1/2 parts dried mix to 1 part water. Wait 5 to 10 minutes and then add a little more water if it’s too dry. Serve as a dip with Greek pitas or your favorite crackers or use as a spread in a wrap.

Tip
If you need to increase your fat intake for cold-weather hiking, drizzle a little olive oil on the hummus just before you eat it.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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dehydration time: 5 to 10 hours
makes 2 to 4 servings

Bagels survive well in a backpack. The hint of lime in the salsa complements the tuna; chicken would also work well in this wrap.

1/4 cup frozen corn, thawed
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 cup salsa
1/4 cup canned black beans, drained and rinsed
2 foil pouches tuna, approximately 3 ounces each
2 multigrain bagels

At Home
Mix corn, lime juice, salsa, and black beans together. Spread the mixture on lined dehydrator trays and dry for 5 to 10 hours. Place the dried salsa in a ziplock bag with the pouches of tuna. Wrap and pack two bagels in plastic wrap and place them in the ziplock bag with the other ingredients.

At Camp
Remove the tuna pouches from the ziplock bag. Add warm water to the salsa mixture, using a little less water than dried mix. Once rehydrated, add the tuna to the salsa mixture and place 1/4 of the mixture on each half of the bagel. Serve open faced.

Tip
If you are planning to have this for lunch on the trail, add cold water to the salsa mixture at breakfast, and it’ll be ready by the time you stop for lunch.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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dehydration time: 5 to 7 hours
makes 2 to 4 servings
 


I love tomatoes and roasting them really brings out their flavor. If you like things a little spicier then increase the cayenne pepper to suit your tastes.

1 small shallot
1/4 cup onion
1 clove garlic
2 cups grape or cherry tomatoes
1 tablespoon olive oil
kosher salt, to taste
black pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried ancho chile
1 teaspoon fresh cilantro
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon lime zest (optional)
1 cup cannellini beans or white kidney beans, drained and rinsed

At Home
Preheat oven to 350ºF. Mince the shallot and onion. Cut the garlic and tomatoes in half. Put the shallot, onion, garlic and tomatoes in a shallow baking dish and drizzle with the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Bake for 45 minutes stirring occasionally. The tomatoes will start to brown and become very soft. Remove from the oven and let the mixture cool.

Place the tomato mixture in a blender or food processor with the remaining ingredients and pulse until well combined. Dehydrate on a lined tray as you would for fruit leather. The dip takes between 5 and 7 hours to dry. Once it is dry, you can grind it into a powder using a spice or coffee grinder to make it easier to rehydrate. Pack into a ziplock bag along with the camp instructions.

At Camp
Rehydrate the bean dip using a formula of 1½ parts dried mix to 1 part water. Wait 5 or 10 minutes and then add a little more water if necessary. When you reach your lunch stop, enjoy the dip with crackers, bread sticks, Greek pita wedges, or tortilla chips. It is also good in a wrap with chicken or vegetables.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2007
recipe courtesy of www.wildernesscooking.com

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