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Archive for the ‘Breakfasts’ Category

My return to posting on this blog has been a long time coming. I’ve been busy with the challenges of a new baby, finishing the manuscript for my second wilderness cookbook, outdooradventurecanada.com, and life in general. Another Fork in the Trail, is now in the publisher’s hands and I will see the layouts this week. The book should be on shelves by mid-May.

Amidst all of this I have been writing a monthly recipe column for Seattle Backpackers Magazine.

Here are the links to each month’s instalments…

December 2010: Quinoa – A Superfood for the Trail

January 2011: Winter Drinks to Warm You Up

February 2011: Romancing the Trail

March 2011: Soup’s On – Pizza Soup and Ribollita

I hope you enjoy the recipes and articles. I’ll be posting more recipes on the backpacking recipes blog soon.

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yogurt with granola and dried berries

yogurt with granola and dried berries

Yes, you can make fresh yogurt on the trail — I’ve been doing it on wilderness trips for as long as I can remember.  While not part of the ultralight mindset because of the need for a thermos, is a great treat and is a wonderful way to get some calcium.

This recipe isn’t really a recipe — it’s more of a technique and it requires a little advance planning. 

trail yogurt

makes 2 to 3 servings

Making homemade yogurt is very easy to do on the trail. You will need a 2-cup, high-quality, very clean, stainless steel thermos for this, and it is one of those recipes actually works better with powdered milk. It is best to make yogurt in the late afternoon the day before as it takes the culture some time to do its job. You should probably test this recipe at home first to get the hang of it. Once you do, you’ll be making fresh yogurt on many of your trips.

8 tablespoons milk powder
1 teaspoon yogurt culture powder
1 3/4 cups water
Honey or vanilla sugar (optional)

At Home
Measure the milk powder accurately and put in a small ziplock freezer bag. Put the culture in a snack-sized sandwich bag and place that in the bag with the milk powder. Be sure to include a copy of the directions below.

At Camp
Boil 1/4 cup of water and pour it in your thermos to warm the metal. Mix 1 3/4 cup water and milk powder together in a pan. Scald the milk by heating it until the edges start to bubble and it reaches the boiling point. Be careful not to boil though. Remove the milk from the heat and cool until the milk is warmer than body temperature but not overly hot. If the milk is too hot, you will kill the culture; and if it’s too cool, the yogurt will not set.

Discard the now cooled water out of the thermos. Then put the yogurt culture in the thermos and add a little bit of the warm milk. Stir until the powder has dissolved. Then pour the remaining milk into the thermos. Stir well and secure the lid tightly. Put the thermos in a large ziplock bag and then inside a cozy. At bedtime take it into your sleeping bag with you. If you are a restless sleeper wrap the cozy in some clothing and set it beside you where you won’t knock it over.  Avoid disturbing it as much as possible; do not shake or stir. By morning, you will have yogurt. If you don’t like unsweetened yogurt, add a little honey or vanilla sugar to it before serving.

Tips
You need as much milk powder as you would normally use to make 2 cups of milk even though you will only be making 1 3/4 cups. These extra milk solids make for a richer and better texture.  

The yogurt may not incubate if you use old culture. Freeze-dried berries go well with yogurt, and it makes a great topping for a bowl of granola.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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This recipe does require some cooking at camp and you will need a surface for frying. I generally use the frying pan from my MSR Duralite Gourmet Cookset but some sets come with a pot lid suitable for frying and that would suffice for this recipe.

You could use wild blueberries in this recipe, if you were so inclined, but I prefer to leave those for the birds and other animals. Instead of syrup you could use a little sprinkle of lemon and some powdered sugar.

chai tea pancakes

makes 2 servings

The spice of chai tea perfectly complements the blueberries in this pancake.

4 tablespoons milk powder
2 tablespoons whole powdered egg
1 cup flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup dried blueberries
1 chai tea bag or enough loose tea to make 1 cup
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
butter (optional)
maple syrup (optional)
3/4–1 cup water

At Home
Mix the milk powder, powdered egg, flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar together in a large ziplock freezer bag. Wrap the blueberries in plastic wrap and place them, along with the chai tea bag, in the freezer bag with the dry ingredients. Add butter and vegetable oil to what you will take on your trip. Pack the syrup in a leakproof bottle.

At Camp
Add 1/2 cup boiling water to the chai tea bag and let steep for 3 to 5 minutes. Allow the tea to cool for a few minutes and then add 1/2 cup cool water. Add the blueberries to the dry ingredients. Add 3/4 cup of the chai mixture to the dry ingredients in the large ziplock bag. Stir to moisten and add extra water as necessary to obtain a pancake consistency. Do not overmix or the pancakes will be tough. Place a little vegetable oil in a frying pan and heat over medium flame. Pour in 1/4 of the batter and cook until the edges appear dry. Then flip and cook until the underside is golden. Repeat until you have 4 pancakes adding more oil to the pan between each pancake as necessary. Serve with a little butter and syrup if desired.

Tip
The batter is easy to manage if you make it in the ziplock freezer bag. Then simply cut off a corner of the bag and squeeze the batter into the pan. Between pancakes, be careful to situate the bag so that the batter doesn’t spill out of the cut corner.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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apple pie gr-oatmeal

dehydration time: 7 to 10 hours
makes 1 to 2 servings

This warm and hearty oatmeal tastes a little like Mom’s apple pie.

1/3 cup applesauce
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup dried apples, chopped
2 tablespoons of granola
1 – 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
2 packages of regular instant oatmeal
2 tablespoons of soy or whole milk powder

At Home
Mix the cinnamon and applesauce together and spread on a lined dehydrator tray. The mixture will take 7 to 10 hours to dry and will be the consistency of fruit leather.  Wrap the dried applesauce and dried apples together in a piece of plastic wrap. Package the granola and brown sugar in a second piece of plastic wrap. Mix the oatmeal and milk powder together and place in a ziplock bag. Place the fruit and granola bundles in the same ziplock as the other ingredients.

At Camp
Take the apple and applesauce package out of the ziplock. Tear the applesauce leather into small pieces and place in your mug or a freezer bag with the dried apples. Rehydrate with just over 1/3 of a cup of boiling water for 10 to 15 minutes or until the desired consistency is reached. Place oatmeal in a bowl with the milk powder. Add boiling water to preferred consistency. Top with re-hydrated apple mixture and the granola and brown sugar mixture. Stir if desired.

Tip
If you don’t want to bother dehydrating applesauce and aren’t worried about a little weight in your pack then take a single serving container of applesauce.

created by Laurie Ann March ©2004
recipe courtesy of www.wildernesscooking.com

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As anyone who has read my book knows, I love quinoa (pronounced keen-wa). A while ago I was checking out the availability of the grain at Bob’s Red Mill (the online store) and I noticed some recipes including one for a power bar that I thought would be a great addition to one’s trail food. Here is the recipe from the Bob’s Red Mill website. There are lots of great recipes on the site so you should go check it out.

whole grain power bars from Bob’s Red Mill

makes 15 bars

2 cups oats, rolled, quick cooking
1/2 cup quinoa organic grain
1/4 cup flaxseed meal
3/4 cup soy protein powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 cup walnuts-baker’s pieces
1/2 cup sunflower seeds (raw shelled)
1/2 cup cranberries
1/2 cup coconut, shredded
1/2 cup evaporated cane juice
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup water

Cook dry quinoa according to directions. While this is cooking, combine oats, flax, protein powder, baking soda, evaporated cane juice, flour, walnuts, seeds, cranberries, coconut and sea salt in a large bowl.

Once quinoa is cooked, add to the pan the oil, vanilla and water. Add wet ingredients into dry ingredients and mix together.

Spread mixture into greased 9 x 13-inch pan, pressing down with hands to fit into pan. Dough may seem slightly dry, but this is okay. Bake for 20 minutes at 350ºF. Allow to cool and cut into pieces.

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makes 2 servings

Couscous makes a wonderful breakfast food since it cooks very quickly.

1 cup instant couscous
1 1/2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
1/2 cup chopped dried pears, peaches, and mangoes
1 teaspoon crystallized stem ginger
1/2 teaspoon creamed coconut or 3 tablespoons coconut powder
1 1/2 teaspoons butter (optional)
Enough soy or whole milk powder to make 1/2 cup milk
1 1/4 cups, plus 1 teaspoon hot water, plus enough water to reconstitute milk

At Home
Place the couscous and brown sugar in a medium sized freezer ziplock bag. Place the fruit, ginger, milk, and coconut in separate bags, and put the bags in with the couscous. Add the butter to what you are taking on your trip.

At Camp
Bring 1 1/4 cups water to a boil. While you wait mix the couscous and brown sugar mixture with the fruit, ginger, and butter in a freezer ziplock bag. Place the coconut cream in a bag or container large enough to accommodate at least 1/2 cup of liquid. Add 1 teaspoon of hot water to the creamed coconut and mix. If you’re using coconut powder, then you will need to add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water. To the same container add enough milk powder and water to make a 1/2 cup of milk. Carefully pour the boiling water into the bag with the couscous mixture. Let stand 5 minutes. Stir the couscous, scoop it in bowls, and top it with the milk mixture.

From A Fork in the Trail by Laurie Ann March ©2008

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